Easy Science Activities You Can Do at Home!

 

Science activities can be very engaging for kids but may feel daunting if you are trying on your own for the first time. With STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) being incorporated into curriculum, it is important to bring this learning into a child’s home too.

We have created six fun and EASY science activities using common or easy to find household items. You can download the activities by clicking through the links on the images below.

 

Clucking Cup

This activity teaches children about sound. The vibrations of the string, caused by movement, travel along the string and are amplified by the hollow cup, which acts as a sounding board. If you cover the open end of the cup, the vibrations from the string are almost silent = no sound).

 

 

Vinegar Volcano

This activity teaches kids about reaction. The baking soda is a compound called sodium bicarbonate. The vinegar is an acid. When they get mixed together, they react to produce carbon dioxide gas (hence all the bubbly). The detergent helps to trap the bubbles created by the carbon dioxide, so you get much better ‘lava’ from your volcano.

 

Recycled Crayons

Recycled crayons teaches children about the phases of matter. By heating the crayons, you can change their state from one form to another. Once cooled, the forces are strong enough to hold the particles together again to make a solid. The crayons start out as a solid, the heat melts them into a liquid, then they return to their original state as they cool.

 

Shoebox Guitar

Stringed instruments make a sound when their strings vibrate, that’s why you need to pluck the strings of a harp to hear the notes. The strings make different notes depending on their thickness, the amount of tension they’re under and their length. The sound hole helps to make the sound louder by amplifying the vibrations and allowing the top of the shoebox to vibrate slightly. The pencil raises the strings off the lid so they can vibrate more freely.

 

Candypult

This activity educates children on energy transfer. When you pull back the rubber band, you transfer energy to it. The rubber band stores the energy until you let go of it. Once you let go, the rubber band transfers energy to the marshmallow to make it fly through the air.

 

Invisible Ink

Here, we learn about oxidation. When you draw your map or message, the lemon juice is absorbed into the paper. By heating the paper, you create a chemical reaction that releases a chemical element called carbon in the juice. When the lemon juice comes into contact with air, and is heated, it turns brown as carbon is released – a process called oxidation.

 


We hope you enjoy trying these out! What are your favourite science experiments to do?

Is science not for you? How about trying out some of these awesomely engaging edible activities!