How one-on-one mentoring helps youth combat life obstacles

Mentoring is nothing new. Arthur had Merlin, Cinderella had a fairy godmother, and Mark Zuckerberg had Steve Jobs. One-on-one mentoring helped all these characters achieve great things, both in fiction and real life. Pyjama Angels are unsung heroes in daily life, but the impact from their one-on-one mentoring has helped young people rise to the challenge life throws at them.

 

So how does one-on-one mentoring help little kids and young people?

 

Children in foster care have a hard time at school thanks to their circumstances; they can’t pay attention, refuse to interact, or start fights with classmates to name a few problems. This comes from past trauma and generally low self-esteem. Pyjama Angels mentor a young person to help them with their education. This can be something as simple as reading a book.

It’s never too soon to start

Pyjama Angels are a positive influence in their mentee’s life. That one hour a week helps the children cope with school. Thanks to their Pyjama Angel, they’re finishing homework, reading books without being asked, and getting better report cards each term.

 

One-on-one mentoring with a child in foster care sets them up for success in their young adult life. They’re more likely to seek out a good circle of friends over a crowd that is likely to break the rules. Young people who get mentoring early in life are more likely to graduate high school and might even become a mentor themselves as an adult. Their outlook on life is also more positive, mentees grow up to realise that despite their past, they are worthy of a good job, a happy home, and being safe.

 

One-on-one mentoring is challenging for both mentors and their child in the beginning. An important trait in Pyjama Angels is their resilience. They’re empathic, kind, supportive, and also push their mentee, but within reason. Pyjama Angels are screened, trained, and matched with a child in the Love of Learning Program. The first few weeks, if not months, will be challenging because you’re getting to know each other; trust and rapport need to be built. But relationships need time to grow. And who knows? Within a year, mentees might go from hating books to reading three a week!